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WWI | Beyond the Front Lines | Knights of Columbus Museum | Start of the first world war

World War I

Historical exhibition with images, artifacts and interactives, including a full-scale replica trench overlooking 'No-man's land.' Suitable for all ages. Groups welcome. April 6, 2017-December 30, 2018

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Vatican Cross | Knights of Columbus Museum

Vatican Cross

This cross was presented to the Knights of Columbus by Pope Saint John Paul II as an expression of gratitude for the organization's restoration the exterior façade of St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City during the 1980s. The copper-clad cross, which was replaced during the renovation, dates to 1613 was part of a statue of Christ the Redeemer atop the basilica.

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Knights of Columbus Museum | Museum exhibit | Columbia

Permanent Collection

These galleries uniquely appeal to Knights of Columbus and those interested in the history and achievements of the international organization founded in 1882 by Father Michael J. McGivney.

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CURATOR'S CHOICE CURATOR'S CHOICE

CURATOR'S CHOICE CURATOR'S CHOICE CURATOR'S CHOICE CURATOR'S CHOICE CURATOR'S CHOICE

This roll top desk (circa 1917-18), a gift of Bernard W. Bruna from Council 1743 in Hanover, Kansas, was used at a Knights of Columbus recreation center at Fort Riley, Kansas, during World War I. A small brass plate attached to the desk reads “Compliments of Knights of Columbus Committee on War Activities,” which was the department that oversaw all of the Knights’ relief efforts during the war.

The Knights of Columbus operated recreation centers, known as “huts,” both domestically and abroad, providing soldiers with a much needed respite from the war. There were 359 huts across the United States. Those who served the soldiers in the huts were known as Knights of Columbus secretaries, or “Caseys.”

This roll top desk (circa 1917-18), a gift of Bernard W. Bruna from Council 1743 in Hanover, Kansas, was used at a Knights of Columbus recreation center at Fort Riley, Kansas, during World War I. A small brass plate attached to the desk reads “Compliments of Knights of Columbus Committee on War Activities,” which was the department that oversaw all of the Knights’ relief efforts during the war.

The Knights of Columbus operated recreation centers, known as “huts,” both domestically and abroad, providing soldiers with a much needed respite from the war. There were 359 huts across the United States. Those who served the soldiers in the huts were known as Knights of Columbus secretaries, or “Caseys.”

This roll top desk (circa 1917-18), a gift of Bernard W. Bruna from Council 1743 in Hanover, Kansas, was used at a Knights of Columbus recreation center at Fort Riley, Kansas, during World War I. A small brass plate attached to the desk reads “Compliments of Knights of Columbus Committee on War Activities,” which was the department that oversaw all of the Knights’ relief efforts during the war.

The Knights of Columbus operated recreation centers, known as “huts,” both domestically and abroad, providing soldiers with a much needed respite from the war. There were 359 huts across the United States. Those who served the soldiers in the huts were known as Knights of Columbus secretaries, or “Caseys.”

This roll top desk (circa 1917-18), a gift of Bernard W. Bruna from Council 1743 in Hanover, Kansas, was used at a Knights of Columbus recreation center at Fort Riley, Kansas, during World War I. A small brass plate attached to the desk reads “Compliments of Knights of Columbus Committee on War Activities,” which was the department that oversaw all of the Knights’ relief efforts during the war.

The Knights of Columbus operated recreation centers, known as “huts,” both domestically and abroad, providing soldiers with a much needed respite from the war. There were 359 huts across the United States. Those who served the soldiers in the huts were known as Knights of Columbus secretaries, or “Caseys.”

This roll top desk (circa 1917-18), a gift of Bernard W. Bruna from Council 1743 in Hanover, Kansas, was used at a Knights of Columbus recreation center at Fort Riley, Kansas, during World War I. A small brass plate attached to the desk reads “Compliments of Knights of Columbus Committee on War Activities,” which was the department that oversaw all of the Knights’ relief efforts during the war.

The Knights of Columbus operated recreation centers, known as “huts,” both domestically and abroad, providing soldiers with a much needed respite from the war. There were 359 huts across the United States. Those who served the soldiers in the huts were known as Knights of Columbus secretaries, or “Caseys.”